Parshas Emor

Parshas Emor

By Rabbi Shmuel Gluck

This Parsha discusses what disqualifies Kohanim from serving in the Bais Hamikdosh. One of those disqualifications is becoming Tomei. It doesn’t matter whether the cause of the Tumah was avoidable, such as by touching a dead animal, or one that seems to be out of their control, such as Tzora’as.

The Akeida explains that there are many circumstances that seem out of people’s control, but aren’t. He writes: Ki Chol Ma She’yochol Le’zoher Mimenu, V’lo Nizhor, Harei Hu Ri‘tzono. Anything that people could have avoided by being mindful, but didn’t, is considered to have happened to them willingly. People can avoid Tzora’as by not speaking Loshon Horo, and people can avoid touching dead animals by being more careful.

I often tell people that successful people focus on their contributions to a problem, even when their contributions are minimal. Unsuccessful people focus on other people’s contributions, even when their own are significant.

The Akeida’s message limits people’s ability to say, “It’s not my fault” since, with the proper foresight, most circumstances are avoidable. I often tell people that successful people focus on their contributions to a problem, even when their contributions are minimal. Unsuccessful people focus on other people’s contributions, even when their own are significant.

Kohanim in particular are expected to be Zirizim, to act with deliberation. Despite this trait being attributed to Kohanim, all people are supposed to act in the same manner.

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